Page Title

Pea and Lentil Root Rot Diagnosis and Resources

Body

(07/09/20)

Growers should be on the lookout for root rot symptoms in their pea and lentil fields.

Growers should be on the lookout for root rot symptoms in their pea and lentil fields.  Compared to healthy plants, those affected by root rot have a degraded root system, brown to black in color, with fewer lateral roots and nodules (Figure 1).  In fields with a long-term history (10+ years) of close rotations of peas and lentils (pea-x-lentil-x), root rot may be severe.  As the disease progresses, or plants become drought or nutrient stressed, above ground symptoms of yellowing, stunting and wilting become apparent. Yellowing typically begins from the ground up. 

If you find symptoms consistent with root rot, identification of the causal agent will drive future management strategies. The presence of Aphanomyces euteiches causing Aphanomyces root rot in peas and lentils will require longer rotations (6-8) away from both peas and lentils.  In the latest episode of the Growing Pulse Crops podcast series, farmer Lavern Johnson from Divide County, ND discusses how close rotations of peas and lentils over the years has resulted in unmanageable levels of root rot in his fields.

https://www.growingpulsecrops.com/episode/seed-treatments-root-rots   Prevention through lengthening of crop rotations is critical to the long-term management of root rot.

The Dry Pea and Lentil Root Rot Management Guide recently published by NDSU Extension provides greater detail on the pathogens that cause root rot in these crops and resources on submitting samples for diagnosis (Figure 2).

https://www.ag.ndsu.edu/publications/crops/dry-pea-and-lentil-root-rot-management-guide

The Pulse Crop Working Group, with support from the North Central IPM Center, produced the Growing Pulse Crops podcast series and the NDSU Dry Pea and Lentil Root Rot Management Guide.

ppth.15

Audrey Kalil

Plant Pathologist

NDSU Williston Research Extension Center

This site is supported in part by the Crop Protection and Pest Management Program [grant no. 2017-70006-27144/accession 1013592] from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed are those of the website author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Powerpt_usda_nifa_centered_rgb_300